Tag Archives: jobs

Fashion Panel Gives Students Career Advice

by DEEPA RAMUDAMU

Six panelists working in the fashion industry described the realities of their jobs and advised students on how to get their foot in the door during Careers in Fashion at the University Career Center yesterday.

The panel included two University of Maryland College Park students who interned at companies like Harper’s Bazaar Magazine and Bochic Jewelry.

Kate Juhl, program director for the UMD College of Arts and Humanities and University Career Center, moderated questions such as how students can market themselves and get jobs in fashion.

Christopher Schafer speaks to students next to Meg Ely and Nikki Billie Jean. Courtesy of Allene Abrahamian/College of Arts and Humanities
Christopher Schafer speaks to students as he sits next to Meg Ely and Nikki Billie Jean.
Courtesy of Allene Abrahamian/College of Arts and Humanities.

While many people see New York City and Los Angeles as the fashion hubs of the United States, the panelists stressed focusing on other cities to start their careers.

Washington D.C. and Baltimore, which are both near the university, are “two different animals for fashion,” said Christopher Schafer, founder of Christopher Schafer Clothier.

Students listen closely as the panelists talk about their careers and give advice. Courtesy of Allene Abrahamian/College of Arts and Humanities
Students listen closely as the panelists talk about their careers and give advice.
Courtesy of Allene Abrahamian/College of Arts and Humanities

The panelists stressed that social media and websites like LinkedIn are crucial to connect with employers as well as clients. All Things Ankara‘s Nikki Billie Jean advised that students keep their accounts as professional as possible. Panelists also advised students to have more than one resume in order to cover all their skills and qualities.

A student speaks to Madeline Albro after the panel ends. Courtesy of Allene Abrahamian/College of Arts and Humanities
A student speaks to Madeline Albro after the panel ends.
Courtesy of Allene Abrahamian/College of Arts and Humanities

The panelists even talked about what to do after landing a job.

“You should also be able to answer questions like ‘what’s your competition doing?’ so that you can create ideas to give your company a leg up,”  said Madeline Albro, senior product line manager at Under Armour.

Oru Wonodi, a sophomore business and Spanish double major, said she came to the event after catching wind of it through fashion organization MasTERPiece!

One thing she said she learned was that while she develops her own brand, she can still design other types of clothing like wedding dresses for extra income.

Wonodi is also a fashion designer; she is the founder of NOVA Prints and Apparel, which she hopes will be nationally recognized by her senior year.

Models wear off NOVA Prints and Apparel clothing. Courtesy of Oru Wonodi
Models wear NOVA Prints and Apparel clothing.
Courtesy of Oru Wonodi

Upcoming fashion events on campus include a networking session and a book signing.

Robots: Your Future Journalists

by DAN SCHWALB

Forget about illegal immigrants taking your job. There is a bigger threat to American employment: machines. Journalists are no exception to this.

According to Business Insider, journalism is one of nine occupations that will soon be replaced by automation. Other jobs facing extinction include store clerks, pharmacists, drivers, and soldiers. Those who are skeptical about robots taking jobs should look no further than phone operators and toll booth attendants. These one-time common occupations are now frequently done by machine.

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How can it be that robots will take over the field of journalism? After all, a robot is not capable of writing a story, right? Wrong. There has already been software developed that will generate a story from computer data, without any input from humans.

Narrative Science is one such software, and is used by the Big Ten Network to release college baseball articles. Earlier this year, the L.A. Times released an earthquake story generated by their robot software “Quakebot”. The story hit the Internet three minutes after the earthquake struck, allowing L.A. Times to beat out all of their competitors.

Journalism software functions on algorithms developed by computer programmers. The algorithms give machines a pre-set structure for writing a story. The only thing left for the machine to do is collect data, plug it into this formula, and the story is complete. Think of this process as a computers way of playing Madlibs.

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Besides sheer speed, there are other reasons why journalists may be replaced by machine.

1. Journalism can be a dangerous job, with reporters working in violent environments to gather their facts. Last week was a reminder of this when American journalist James Foley was beheaded on video, by an ISIS terrorist. With American lives at risk, major media outlets may elect to use robots for collecting data, filming footage and conducting interviews. This information could then be transferred to narrative software, for an instant story.

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Should journalists live in fear of our entire industry becoming automated? Not exactly. Although robots are capable of writing news stories, they can only generate pure facts, data and information. A robot will have no creativity involved in their column (as far as we can tell!). Furthermore, a robot will not be able to write why an issue is important, or how it could affect us in the future. These questions will still left for human journalists to answer.

Journalism jobs won’t disappear completely, but they will require different tasks. Whereas today’s journalists collect facts and put them together in a story, future journalists will need to write creatively and abstractly. Society will still look to their human counterparts for opinionated articles, future predictions, political stances and movie reviews. The future journalist must be capable of thinking outside the box, going above and beyond the raw facts. Because robots will have that covered.

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